St. Martin’s Press. Publication Date: September 10, 2019

“Give me one name. One person. And I will make them disappear.”

Book Summary:  Sarah is a young professor struggling to prove herself in a workplace controlled by the charming and manipulative Alan Hawthorne. A renowned scholar and television host, Hawthorne rakes in million-dollar grants for the university where Sarah works—so his inappropriate treatment of female colleagues behind closed doors has gone unchallenged for years. And Sarah is his newest target.

When Hawthorne’s advances become threatening, Sarah is left with nowhere to turn. Until the night she witnesses an attempted kidnapping of a young child on her drive home, and impulsively jumps in to intervene. The child’s father turns out to be a successful businessman with dangerous connections—and her act of bravery has put this powerful man in her debt. He gives Sarah a burner phone and an unbelievable offer. A once-in-a-lifetime deal that can make all her problems disappear.

No consequences. No traces. All it takes is a 29-second phone call.

My Thoughts: A thriller for the #metoo era.  Kudos to the author for tackling some very difficult subject matter— sexual harassment in the workplace.  The main character, Sarah, is in a weakened and vulnerable state.  Her husband has left her with her two young children to care for which makes her desperate to keep her job.  I don’t think I’ve read quite an awful character like Alan Hawthorne in a long time.

I enjoyed the author’s previous book, Lies, and I really wanted to read this one.  I struggled to write my review because the subject matter hits close to home.  I really felt for Sarah in one aspect—the feeling of being trapped in a situation, in this case, her job.  I could feel her desperation, her vulnerability, her pain.  This thriller zips along with twists and turns and then, that ending!  This book made me think about what I would do if I were in a similar situation.  Would I make that call?  Would you?

Many thanks to St. Martins Press #partner and NetGalley for my copy in exchange for an honest review.

11 Comments

    1. Unfortunately I can identify with Sarah in some ways. I have experienced harassment in the workplace and I know what it feels like to be trapped in a job and not knowing what to do or how to get out of it.

      Liked by 1 person

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